Interviews

  • broadwayworld.com | October 16th, 2014

    BWW Exclusive Interview, Part 2: Thomas Hampson Is Passionate for Opera

    by Erica Miner

    (Continued from Part 1)

    EM: Let’s now transition into opera. I of course remember with great fondness and was deeply impressed with your debut at the Met, which I was able to see from the pit. Since then opera has been, to me, as large an identification with your persona as anything else. I’d love to talk about how you love to sing Strauss and Verdi. Do you lean toward Verdi, or do you feel equally passionate about Strauss?

    TH: I’m not sure I really prefer one or the other composer but for several years I can say that I’ve enjoyed the ability to only sing operas that passionately engage me. I can only give my body and mind and voice to characters in which I find my connection. They don’t have to be nice people, they have to be important people. Don Giovanni is a deeply disturbing person, but he’s very important, because we all have Giovanni inside of us. I’m not very good with my favorite this or that, but the musical languages of Verdi, Wagner, Mahler and Strauss are so demonstrably different from one another, that is both the challenge and, quite frankly, the excitement for me. It keeps you on your toes, it keeps you on your edge, you’re always rethinking things. Singing Boccanegra and singing Mandryka (Arabella) couldn’t be any more different a challenge than you could want as a singer. And to some extent, going back to classical music’s own worst enemy, this whole fach mentality, this idea what kind of voice should sing this or that, we get ourselves caught up in the unnecessary. So pertaining to that system, that I would sing both Boccanegra and Mandryka is a curious juxtaposition. I love that challenge. That’s just where I live. I love assuming those two different personas, trying to understand and meet the challenges of those two great composing masters. I also loved singing Gluck’s Iphigenie en Tauride and I’m equally passionate about contemporary opera.

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  • broadwayworld.com | October 15th, 2014

    BWW Exclusive Interview, Part 1: Thomas Hampson Talks of Song – and Bernstein

    by Erica Miner

    Known for his versatility and the remarkable intelligence and introspection he brings to his interpretations from the opera stage to the concert and recital hall, lyric baritone Thomas Hampson has scored triumph after triumph in a stellar international career whose length and degree of success belie his still youthful age. Hampson performed Aaron Copland’s Old American Songs at Tanglewood last summer, and this month returns to his western US roots to star in the dramatically complex, vocally challenging role of Renato in San Francisco Opera’s production of Verdi’s Un Ballo in Maschera (A Masked Ball). His passion for the vocal arts is inspiring.

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  • SRF | October 13th, 2014

    Der Anwalt der Lieder

    by Andreas Müller-Crepon

    Der Bariton Thomas Hampson ist ein Opernstar. Doch schon als jungen Sänger haben ihn die Lieder von Schubert, Schumann und Mahler begeistert. Mit seiner «Hampsong Foundation» versteht er sich heute als prominenter Anwalt für das Lied als Kunstform.

    Beim Besuch im Münchner Apartment, wo Thomas Hampson während seines Gastspiels an der Staatsoper logiert, wird schnell klar: Hier geht ein Allround-Profi ans Werk. Hampson hat in seinem Laptop alle Lieder parat, um die es im Gespräch gehen soll – und zwar in mehreren Versionen. Zielstrebig und konzentriert diskutiert er die Vorschläge und entwickelt nebenbei gleich noch ein, zwei Konzert-Ideen.

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  • Radio Classique | September 1st, 2014

    Recontre: Thomas Hampson, Tout L’Amour

    by Jérémie Rousseau

    À bientôt soixante ans, avec trente ans de carrière derrière lui,Thomas Hampson est toujours un des meilleurs barytons. Son tout récent disque Richard Strauss le prouve.

    Bâtir au disque un programme de lieder de Richard Strauss : comment s’y prendre, que choisir et ne pas choisir ?

    Hormis une dizaine d’années d’interruption, le lied accompagne Richard Strauss du début à la fin de sa vie. C’est ce que cet album cherche à refléter, avec un parcours allant des années 1880, le Zueignung op. 10 en lever de rideau –, à l’Opus 87 écrit quarante ans plus tard. Pas question d’oublier des classiques comme Morgen, Ruhe meine Seele, ni le plus rare Notturno avec violon solo. Je pense qu’on perçoit dans ce disque toutes les phases de l’écriture vocale de Strauss, qui se cherche d’abord puis décrit un éventail d’une très large richesse.

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  • BR Klassik | July 8th, 2014

    “Liebst du um Schönheit”

    by Nicola Eißer

    Thomas Hampson im Interview | BR Klassik

    Über seine im Juni 2014 erschienene Autobiografie “Liebst du um Schönheit” sprach Nicola Eißer mit dem US-Bariton Thomas Hampson.

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Thomas Hampson

> More YouTube videos

  • Thomas Hampson - "Wo die schönen Trompeten blasen" by Gustav Mahler; Wolfram Rieger, piano
    This is from the "Voices of our Time" special featuring several Mahler Lieder selections.

  • Théâtre du Châtelet production of Strauss' Arabella. "Zdenkerl, du bist die Bessere von uns Zweien" from Act III. Cast: Karita Mattila (Arabella), Thomas Hampson (Mandryka), Barbara Bonney (Zdenka)... Christoph von Dohnányi conducts the Philharmonia Orchestra.